Move over, kale: Turmeric is here to stay.

September 30, 2017

Happy Saturday, lovelies.

In recent months I have heard many people asking questions about turmeric. Is turmeric the new kale? What are the benefits? How does it taste? How can I use it on a day to day basis? Is it all created equal?

While I am certainly not qualified to answer all of these questions, here is a basic summary on what the benefits of turmeric are and how I’ve incorporated it into my diet.

First things first: tumeric or turmeric? While tumeric may be the phonetic spelling, it is in fact turmeric. As Bill Nye said one too many times: “Now you know!!!!”

Now, for the good stuff.

What is turmeric?

More than just an ingredient in curry, this bright orange spice also boasts several health-boosting properties. Turmeric has also played an important role in traditional Eastern cultures and Ayurvedic medicine. Much of its new-found popularity is due to its therapeutic properties. The bioactive compounds in the main active ingredient, curcumin, have powerful anti-inflammatory effects and as such it is a very strong antioxidant. Most of the studies on this herb are using turmeric extracts that contain mostly curcumin itself, with dosages usually exceeding 1 gram per day. It would be very difficult to reach these levels just using the turmeric spice in your foods.

Therefore, if you want to experience the full effects, then you need to take an extract that contains significant amounts of curcumin.

Why is inflammation important? I found a great excerpt from healthline.com that I will share here:

Inflammation is incredibly important.

It helps the body fight foreign invaders and also has a role in repairing damage.

Although acute (short-term) inflammation is beneficial, it can become a major problem when it is chronic (long-term) and inappropriately deployed against the body’s own tissues.

It is now believed that chronic, low-level inflammation plays a major role in almost every chronic, Western disease. This includes heart disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, Alzheimer’s and various degenerative conditions.

Therefore, anything that can help fight chronic inflammation is of potential importance in preventing and even treating these diseases.

Anti-inflammatory properties are one of the several benefits of turmeric, and the research and clinical trials continue. To note: I am a dorky tax accountant and clearly not a medical professional; however, we can’t deny something that could potentially be this good for us – and not to mention that it can taste delicious, too. We do know one hell of a nutritionist though who is well versed in this and many other areas surrounding food and what we put in our bodies. Mandy King, we love you!

Where to buy?

You can find the spice in really any grocery store. Our favorite retailers are the Silk Road Spice Merchants in Inglewood or Calgary Farmers market, or the spice market at Granary Road (stay tuned for more on this….). For information on the extract supplements visit your favorite nutritionist or health food store for guidance.

Here are a few amazing recipes that we have loved that incorporate turmeric.

Golden Hummus: http://www.healthyeatingandliving.ca/recipe/golden-hummus

My personal favorite – Turmeric Coconut Rice: https://www.mysequinedlife.com/turmeric-coconut-basmati-rice/

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Turmeric Dressing: https://www.bonappetit.com/recipe/turmeric-tahini-dressing

Feel free to leave comments if you have any questions, and I will have my nutritionist guru assist us to answer those questions. Also – if anyone dare take a selfie using a turmeric mask, please do and send on over to us.

Leaving you with a dreamy and refreshing turmeric latte courtesy of Mandy…

1 TBSP grated ginger

1 cup water

1 cup almond milk (homemade is best – makes it more frothy)

1 tsp turmeric powder (or 1 TBSP fresh turmeric grated)

1 TBSP raw honey

1/2 tsp cinnamon

1 TBSP coconut oil

Grate the ginger and add it with all other ingredients into a saucepan. Heat over medium for about 3-5 minutes, stirring often and removing from heat before it boils. Strain out the ginger (or keep it in if you like it spicey) and transfer the liquid to a blender.

Blend for about 20 seconds or until frothy. ENJOY!

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Xo

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